Saturday, March 12, 2011

Men Without Pants...From Paris

Now, I am not suggesting for a moment that men who don't wear pants are not genius...(Okay. Maybe I am suggesting that). 

I may also be suggesting that unless your name has 'His Royal Highness' in front of it,  men who wear kilts have 'issues.'

    

DailyBrisk 'Testosteronely' Gifted? ...From Paris

Note to readers:  ALERT! There is an over abundance of testosterone...I mean... 'GENUIS' on DailyBrisk.  Seriously. The 'boys' on DB are in fact, seriously gifted.  I agree with the article.  You don't see this in the "normal population."  Go DB boys!  

"Giftedness Linked to Prenatal Exposure of Higher Levels of Testosterone"


ScienceDaily (Mar. 12, 2011) — A longstanding debate as to whether genius is a byproduct of good genes or good environment has an upstart challenger that may take the discussion in an entirely new direction. University of Alberta researcher Marty Mrazik says being bright may be due to an excess level of a natural hormone..."There seems to be some evidence that excessive prenatal exposure to testosterone facilitates increased connections in the brain, especially in the right prefrontal cortex," said Mrazik. "That's why we see some intellectually gifted people with distinct personality characteristics that you don't see in the normal population."

Japan nuclear engineers are the heroes



We have confirmed that the walls of this building were what exploded, and not the reactor’s container,” Edano said, adding, “There was no large amount of radiation leakage outside. At this point, there has been no major change to the level of radiation leakage outside, so we'd like everyone to respond calmly."

When public sector unions win who pays the price?

Think about it: When education unions succeed in wringing every concession they can out of their particular piece of a school system, the squeeze is felt mainly by people who have to rely on the whole of that school system: Goodbye, gym class; hello, parents' paying out of pocket for all kinds of "extras" — and these are not, by and large, parents who can just throw their hands up and say, “That's it, he's going to Buckley!” When transit workers' demands shut down services or drive up fares, it barely registers with the rich who ferry themselves in taxis and towncars from one gilded district to another. It hurts those who can't get to their jobs without a bus or subway — and who need to count every cent that commute costs them

Freedom is being killed slowly in Libya, while we do...what? Oh yes, we are "monitoring". Other Despots will learn form this.

Libyan Rebels Lose Oil Port

libya_0303
Pro-Gaddafi forces retake Ras Lanouf, but opposition vows comeback by tomorrow “at the latest.”
Read more: http://thepage.time.com/#ixzz1GQUxMVYA

Japan Nuclear Power Plants: That looks like a 2,000 pound bomb going off.

In this video image taken from NTV Japan via APTN, smoke raises from Fukushima Daiichi power plant's Unit 1 in Okumamachi

Huge explosion at nuclear plant

The UN nuclear watchdog says Japan is evacuating 170,000 people from the area near a nuclear power plant damaged in the devastating earthquake and tsunami.

The Border

American Professor Kidnapped in Border City

Armed men take Northern Arizona University professor hostage in violent Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez

Japan’s SuperQuack: Now 170,000 evacuated due to nuclear radiation leaks

AP

URGENT: Hundreds of Thousands Ordered to Leave Nuclear Plant Areas

LATEST UPDATE: Nearly 170,000 people have been evacuated from areas around two damaged nuclear power plants as rescue teams have hard time looking for survivors because of aftershocks

Another Japanese Reactor going bad.

Japan Fukushima nuclear plant faces new reactor problem


NOW A THIRD REACTOR

TOKYO, March 13 (Reuters) - A quake-hit Japanese nuclear plant reeling from an explosion at one of its reactors has also lost its emergency cooling system at another reactor, Japan's nuclear power safety agency said on Sunday.

The emergency cooling system is no longer functioning at the No.3 reactor at Tokyo Electric Power Co's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility, requiring the facility to urgently secure a means to supply water to the reactor, an official of the Japan Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency told a news conference.

On Saturday, an explosion blew off the roof and upper walls of the building housing the facility's No. 1 reactor, stirring alarm over a possible major radiation release, although the government later said the explosion had not affected the reactor's core vessel and that only a small amount of radiation had been released.

Remember your guest want steak. Full ingredients and menu at the link.

5 Uncommon Foods to Cook on the Grill

1. Quesadilla

Maris of InGoodTasteBlog.net is fearless about grilling—and this tasty a.m. option proves it. Simple and satisfying with all the flavors you love about breakfast (think: eggs, bacon and cheese), this protein-packed recipe puts a unique grilling spin on a typical classic..

2. Butter Lettuce

Clay and Zach from TheBittenWord.com love to host dinner parties, and this grilled salad is an easy and entertaining way to feed guests. 3. Mussels

Inspired by Fergus Henderson and his famed “whole animal” approach to cooking, Ryan of NoseToTailatHome.com is attempting to make anything and everything—including mussels on the grill. 4. Poundcake

Poundcake, sorbet and sweetened flaked coconut is all you need for this delectable dessert road-tested by Amy Wisniewski, associate food editor for CHOW.com.

5. Doughnuts

http://www.womansday.com/Articles/Recipes/5-Uncommon-Foods-to-Cook-on-the-Grill.html

So - 4 inches CAN make the earth move and time stand still

(CNN)

Japan quake so powerful it shifted the earth off its axis by 4 inches, sped up the earth's rotation by 1.6 microseconds, and shifted Japan's coastline by 8 feet.

I once did Dallas to Missoula and back over a long weekend, but that is nothing compared to these guys.

Ultimate road trip: couple drive 142,000 miles, visit 24 countries and have four children

For the past 11 years Herman Zapp 42 and his wife Candelaria 40, from North Carolina, USA, have been driving around the globe in a 1928 Graham Paige vintage car

In January 2000 Herman and Candelaria Zapp from North Carolina, USA, set off in their 83-year-old vintage car. Eleven years later, they have racked up up 142,000 miles and visited 24 countries, while becoming parents to (from left) Paloma, Tehue, Wallaby and Pampa.

For the past 11 years Herman Zapp 42 and his wife Candelaria 40, from North Carolina, USA, have been driving around the globe in a 1928 Graham Paige vintage car

Former IT specialist Herman, 42, and his wife Candelaria, 40, set off from Argentina in a 1928 Graham-Paige car and began driving across South and North America.

trip: couple drive 142,000 miles, visit 24 countries and have four children

For the past 11 years Herman Zapp 42 and his wife Candelaria 40, from North Carolina, USA, have been driving around the globe in a 1928 Graham Paige vintage car

The Zapp family drive through Utah, in 2002

For the past 11 years Herman Zapp 42 and his wife Candelaria 40, from North Carolina, USA, have been driving around the globe in a 1928 Graham Paige vintage car

Wildlife ahead in 2009 in Australia

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/picturegalleries/8376508/Ultimate-road-trip-couple-drive-142000-miles-visit-24-countries-and-have-four-children.html?image=13

Superquake leads to meltdown. More photos.

Thousands missing as horror of Japan's 'superquake' emerges

Amidst tsunami flood waters burning houses and ships are piled in a mass of debris in Kesennuma

Fears were compounded by a massive explosion on at a nuclear reactor, 160 miles north-east of Tokyo.

Japan is battling to avoid a nuclear disaster after an explosion at one of five reactors critically damaged by a ?superquake?

Tsunami devastation in Japan »

Houses lie flattened in Iwaki, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, after a massive earthquake

 

Houses swept out to sea burn following a tsunami and earthquake in Natori City in northeastern Japan

 

O monitoring is starting to resemble OJ’s search…

The President’s Afternoon: A Round of Golf

Reuters

President Obama is spending this cool and cloudy Saturday afternoon playing a round of golf at Joint Base Andrews Naval Air Facility in Maryland.

NPR: only others are bias

Nuclear reactor meltdown: 140,000 evacuated. This is not good.

AP

URGENT: Hundreds of Thousands Ordered to Leave Nuclear Plant Areas

LATEST UPDATE: Nearly 140,000 people have been evacuated from areas around two damaged nuclear power plants as rescue teams have hard time looking for survivors because of aftershocks

Santorum: Sharia law incompatible with Constitution





“Sharia law is not just a religious code. It is also a governmental code. It happens to be both religious in nature and origin, but it is a civil code. And it is incompatible with the civil code of the United States.”



http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0311/51166.html

gary varvel

More Japan Photos

Explosion at one of five reactors critically damaged by a ?superquake?, as up to 10,000 feared missing in one town alone

A ship sits high and dry amongst the destroyed houses and streets of Kesennuma city

Explosion at one of five reactors critically damaged by a ?superquake?, as up to 10,000 feared missing in one town alone

An aerial view of burnt out vehicles washed away by the earthquake triggered tsunami in Hitachinaka

Moslems. What kind of man knifes sleeping children?

Israeli settler family murdered by Palestinians

Massive hunt for killers who knifed parents and children as they slept.

There is a great lesson here for conservatives. There are many honest liberals and they are not necessarily wrong on all issues. (Indeed the human condition teaches us that they are probably right on about one half.) The key for right or left is to be intellectually honest.

Three cheers for Jonathan Haidt
Haidt is the Liberal academic who has shaken up the academic world with his self-analysis and self-criticism. He applies the tools of his discipline to his own stifling academic world. From Neili's Two Bombshells for Social Psychologists:
It is almost impossible to overstate the courage, intellectual clarity, and simple wisdom involved in Jonathan Haidt's challenges to his social psychology colleagues.  His message is as uncompromising as it is uncomplicated: open up the discipline to viewpoints outside the narrow, left-liberal mainstream, learn from people who have political and moral views different than you own, treat religion more fairly, and stop acting like an insular tribal cult and act more like the open-minded science profession you claim to be.
Apparently it takes "great courage" not to think in lockstep nowadays, in academia. It's a fascinating essay.

How can one be so blind as O?

For Every Green Job, Four Other Are Lost

 

Investors Business Daily

A study of renewable energy in Scotland shows that for every job created in the alternative energy sector, almost four jobs are lost in the rest of the economy. We've seen this movie before.

Not only has the sun set on the British Empire, but the promise of wind apparently is deserting it as well. A new study called "Worth The Candle?" by the consulting firm Verso Economics confirms the experience of Spain and other countries: The creation of "green" jobs destroys other jobs through the diversion of resources and the denial of abundant sources of fossil fuel energy.

Bill Clinton Blasts Obama on Drilling

By Darren Goode, Politico

Former President Bill Clinton said Friday that delays in offshore oil and gas drilling permits are "ridiculous" at a time when the economy is still rebuilding, according to attendees at the IHS CERA Week conference.

Clinton spoke on a panel with former President George W. Bush that was closed to the media.

Moslems

Ethiopia: 50 Christian Churches Burned

More than 50 churches, nearly 30 houses, a school and an orphanage along with other Christian-owned buildings have been destroyed by rampaging Muslims in Ethiopia's Jamma region, according to reports from the Christian news service Compass Direct and others.

International Christian Concern's Jonathan Racho has been in contact with a pastor in Ethiopia who confirms that more than 50 churches have been burned - along with a school, an orphanage and an office.

It will be fun to watch, because that is all that O is going to do.

“Libya is turning out to be an interesting test case about how the world can get by without we damned Americans taking the lead and mucking things up.”

Very interesting

INTERACTIVE MAP: Where Americans Are Moving. Very interesting to click on individual counties — I had no idea that my area (Knox County, TN) has gotten so much in-migration from Florida. Meanwhile, for Detroit it’s pretty much all out-migration, and Chicago isn’t much better. But people sure like Dallas, Atlanta, and Seattle. Thanks to Leonid Ardov for the link.

http://www.forbes.com/2010/06/04/migration-moving-wealthy-interactive-counties-map.html

What makes for a long life…and you can throw away almost everything you “know”.

People working. "Don't work too hard, don't stress," doesn't work as advice for good health and long life. Subjects who were the most involved and committed to their jobs did the best. Continually productive men and women lived much longer than their more laid-back comrades

Keys to Long Life? Not What You Might Expect

ScienceDaily (Mar. 12, 2011) — Cheer up. Stop worrying. Don’t work so hard. Good advice for a long life? As it turns out, no. In a groundbreaking study of personality as a predictor of longevity, University of California, Riverside researchers found just the opposite.

"We came to a new understanding about happiness and health," said Martin, now a psychology professor at La Sierra University in Riverside. "One of the findings that really astounds people, including us, is that the Longevity Project participants who were the most cheerful and had the best sense of humor as kids lived shorter lives, on average, than those who were less cheerful and joking. It was the most prudent and persistent individuals who stayed healthiest and lived the longest."

  • Marriage may be good for men's health, but doesn't really matter for women. Steadily married men -- those who remained in long-term marriages -- were likely to live to age 70 and beyond; fewer than one-third of divorced men were likely to live to 70; and men who never married outlived those who remarried and significantly outlived those who divorced -- but they did not live as long as married men.
  • Being divorced is much less harmful to women's health. Women who divorced and did not remarry lived nearly as long as those who were steadily married.
  • "Don't work too hard, don't stress," doesn't work as advice for good health and long life. Terman subjects who were the most involved and committed to their jobs did the best. Continually productive men and women lived much longer than their more laid-back comrades.
  • Starting formal schooling too early -- being in first grade before age 6 -- is a risk factor for earlier mortality. Having sufficient playtime and being able to relate to classmates is very important for children.
  • Playing with pets is not associated with longer life. Pets may sometimes improve well-being, but they are not a substitute for friends.
  • Combat veterans are less likely to live long lives, but surprisingly the psychological stress of war itself is not necessarily a major health threat. Rather, it is a cascade of unhealthy patterns that sometimes follows. Those who find meaning in a traumatic experience and are able to reestablish a sense of security about the world are usually the ones who return to a healthy pathway.
  • People who feel loved and cared for report a better sense of well-being, but it doesn't help them live longer. The clearest health benefit of social relationships comes from being involved with and helping others.
  • http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110311153541.htm
  • Dear Lord…

    AP/Kyodo News

    URGENT: Hundreds Dead, Thousands Missing as Aftershocks Hold RescueLATEST UPDATE: Scale of destruction not yet known as powerful aftershocks and fears of a meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear power plant rattle earthquake-ravaged Japan.

    AP File

    The National Football League officially announced a lockout Saturday that moved the upcoming season of the popular U.S. sport a step closer to cancellation.

    The post-midnight announcement by the league came shortly after the player's union moved to decertify itself and take the standoff into court in the form of a federal antitrust lawsuit filed Friday.

    In need of a peaceful ocean scene


    Breezing Up by Winslow Homer

    NPR's Nina Totenberg In Denial




    I've watched this woman for years on 'Inside Washington' and I
    would say she is reliably left of center.


    Totenberg, along with several other NPR contributors, denounced the actions of Ron Schiller in an open letter. Still, “Inside Washington” host Gordon Peterson said the revelations played right into the stereotype that NPR is “a bunch of lefties.” Totenberg denied that was the case.

    “I know it does, but it’s not true,” she said.

    The affluent, liberal demographic who listen to NPR should be able to support the programming without help from the government. I can hear the pitch now, "Can you donate the cost of just one skinny double-shot vanilla frappuccino per week to keep our excellent programming on air?"

    Two photos tell a story. Note the waves breaking in the lower right hand side. Also note the edge of the runway, the airplane stairs and rectangle shaped building at the edge of the runway. Now look at the second photo.

    A massive tsunami hits the coastal areas of Iwanuma, Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan. (REUTERS/KYODO)

    Sendai Airport is flooded after a tsunami following an earthquake in Sendai.

    The Apps You Need to Prepare Yourself for a Disaster

     The Apps You Need to Prepare Yourself for a DisasterWhen a natural disaster hits there isn't a lot of time to gather supplies. Thankfully, you likely have an invaluable technological multitool in your pocket right now: your smartphone. Here are some apps you should have ready just in case.

    The Apps You Need to Prepare Yourself for a DisasterDisaster Readiness, iPhone, Android: A concise but thorough guide that tells you how to prepare for all manner of disasters, from floods and fires to cyclones and chemical spills. Want to know how to recharge your phone without electricity? How to put together a primo disaster supply kit? Look no further. $1

    The Apps You Need to Prepare Yourself for a DisasterPocket First Aid & CPR, iPhone & Android: The official first aid app of the American Heart Association has extensive guides, many including video, covering how to administer CPR, how to treat various injuries, and how to dress burns, bruises, cuts and other types of wounds. Dan Wooley, an aid worker trapped under rubble during the Haiti earthquake, used this app to find out how to treat his compound fracture; if that's not a a convincing enough testimonial, I don't know what is. $4.

    The Apps You Need to Prepare Yourself for a DisasterEmergency Radio (iPhone), Scanner Radio Pro (Android): In the wake of a disaster, you want to have reliable information. Emergency Radio (iPhone) and Radio Scanner Pro (Android) give you access to a huge database of police, coast guard, fire, EMS, and transit radio across the country. $1, $3 respectively.

    How to balance a budget

    A Budget Success Story

    Democrats try to create the impression that cutting budgets just can't be done.

    Today, my home state of South Dakota became the first state this year to adopt a budget. It was sent to Governor Dennis Daugaard for his signature this afternoon. South Dakota's budget is one that taxpayers in most states can only imagine. It eliminates a $127 million structural deficit. It cuts the budget of every Executive Branch agency by at least 10 percent. It also provides for small cuts in both K-12 education and Medicaid. It relies on no one-time spending fixes, and it includes zero tax increases.

    How does South Dakota do it? Easy. Both houses of the legislature are overwhelmingly Republican; this year's budget passed the House 46-23 and the Senate 28-6, "mostly on party lines." And the Governor is a Republican too. Without Democratic obstruction, budgeting suddenly becomes manageable again.

    Japan's Earthquake: What Lessons?

    There are some news stories about which I feel that we should have something to say, but I have no idea what. The Japanese earthquake and tsunami are in that category. Our thoughts and prayers are with those who are suffering from the devastation.

    No one knows, yet, what the death toll will ultimately be. Currently the number is under 2,000. That undoubtedly will rise, and yet, if there is one lesson that already can be learned, it is that the devastation was limited to an extraordinary degree by top-notch engineering.

    The earthquake was the fifth-most powerful in recorded history, and its epicenter was only 250 miles from Tokyo, one of the world's largest and most densely populated cities. Any yet, as an InstaPundit reader points out, not a single building collapsed and there are no reports of any deaths in the city. That is almost unbelievable.

    To understand how extraordinary it is, recall the death totals in prior, much smaller earthquakes. The U.S. Geological Survey lists earthquakes in which 50,000 or more have died. In 2004, an earthquake comparable to the one that struck Japan killed over 200,000 in Sumatra. Last year's quake in Haiti killed 210,000, and--if I understand the Richter scale correctly--it had only around one percent the destructive power of this week's earthquake in Japan. In 2005, 86,000 were killed in Pakistan. In 2003, more than 30,000 were killed in Iran by an earthquake that was tiny compared to Japan's. This was mostly due to lousy construction, as countless buildings collapsed needlessly, killing those inside.

    ISStoonclr0314.jpg.cms.jpeg


    Little baby, fat adult. I never knew.

    LA BioMed study finds nutritionally deprived newborns are "programmed" to eat more because they develop less neurons in the region of the brain that controls food intake

    Why Low Birth Weight Is Linked to Obesity Later in Life: Study Provides Explanation

    ScienceDaily (Mar. 11, 2011) — Providing further understanding of the link between low birth weights and obesity later in life, researchers found nutritionally deprived newborns are "programmed" to eat more because they develop less neurons in the region of the brain that controls food intake, according to an article published in the journal Brain Research.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110310070311.htm

    Thank you, Dad!

    A longstanding debate as to whether genius is a byproduct of good genes or good environment has an upstart challenger that may take the discussion in an entirely new direction. University of Alberta researcher Marty Mrazik says being bright may be due to an excess level of a natural hormone

    Giftedness Linked to Prenatal Exposure of Higher Levels of Testosterone

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110311153549.htm

    What kind of person thinks this way?

    Chris Matthews on the tsunami: “Was this sort of a good opportunity for the president to remind everybody that he grew up in the United States and Hawaii?”

    Unreal

    It Begins ... The Left Blames Earthquake, Tsunami on Global Warming

    Hours after a massive earthquake rattled Japan, environmental advocates connected the natural disaster to global warming. The president of the European Economic and Social Committee, Staffan Nilsson, issued a statement calling for solidarity in tackling the global warming problem.

    “Some islands affected by climate change have been hit,” said Nilsson. “Has not the time come to demonstrate on solidarity – not least solidarity in combating and adapting to climate change and global warming?”

    BLAMING THE JAPANESE EARTHQUAKE on global warming. Well, you knew that was coming. Global warming is like doughnuts — is there anything it can’t do?

    Obama: It Would Be So Much Easier to Be President of China

    AP

    "Mr. Obama has told people that it would be so much easier to be the president of China. As one official put it, ‘No one is scrutinizing Hu Jintao's words in Tahrir Square.'"

    Japan. It is beyond our imagination even with photos and videos

    AP/Kyodo News

    URGENT: Radiation Leak at Power Plant Stokes Nuclear Meltdown Fears

    LATEST UPDATE: A blast at a Japanese power station destroys the building housing its reactor, but a radiation leak was decreasing despite widespread fears of a nuclear meltdown as powerful aftershocks continue to rattle the area.